Tutorial: Practical makefiles, by example

I know a lot of programmers, who are afraid of makefiles. Most of them come from a windows background, and when they migrate to GNU/Linux or MacOS X they naturally gravitate towards clunky IDEs to manage their build process. Others, fearing that makefiles are going to be too complex to manage manually, try to use even clunkier makefile (or project file) generators like cmake.

While none of the above solutions is without some merit in particular cases, I strongly believe that there’s no faster and simpler way to build your project, than writing a small makefile. And in order to dispel the fear, I decided to write a tutorial about how to write simple, practical makefiles, for your programs.

The article is too big and too … structured, for my idea of what a blog post should be, so I’m hosting it on my web site along with some of my previous articles instead.

So anyway here it is, let me know if you find it useful: Practical makefiles, by example.
Feel free to use the comments section in this post for any feedback, or send me an email if you prefer.

Btw, I used reStructuredText, and the docutils translators for this. So there’s also a PDF version, produced through the rst2latex translator. It’s not as good as it could have been if I wrote it directly in LaTeX, but I suppose it’s serviceable if you prefer a printable off-line version.

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How to use standard output streams for logging in android apps

android_dev

Android applications are strange beasts. Even though under the hood it’s basically a UNIX system using Linux as its kernel, there are other layers between (native) android apps and the bare system, that some things are bound to fall through the cracks.

When developing android apps, one generally doesn’t login to the actual device to compile and execute the program; instead a cross-compiler is provided by google, along with a series of tools to package, install, and execute the app. The degrees of separation from the actual controlling terminal of the application, make it harder to just print debugging messages to the stdout and stderr streams and watch the output like one could do while hacking a regular program. For this reason, the android NDK provides a set of logging functions, which append the messages to a global log buffer. The log buffer can be viewed and followed remotely, from the development machine, over USB, by using the “adb logcat” tool.

This is all well and good, but if you’re porting a program which prints a lot of messages to stdout/stderr, or if you just like the convenience of using the standard printf/cout/etc functions, instead of funny looking stuff like __android_log_print(), you might wonder if there is a way to just use the standard I/O streams instead, right? Well so did I, and guess what… this is still UNIX so the answer is of course you can!

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